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Vertical workload specialization critical to Dell EMC strategy
CHANNEL

Vertical workload specialization critical to Dell EMC strategy 

Dell EMC partners are able to provide Canadian customers with specialized workload expertise that experts the Mass.-based multinational technology corporation cannot provide, said Chad Sakac, president of Dell EMC’s converged platforms division, following his presentation at the Dell EMC Forum in Toronto on Thursday.

Dell EMC can offer up its wide selection of technologies, he said, but to actually get its products and services to “land at a customer” is a challenge because “we are not structured around workloads.

“I have a team that builds technical computing solutions around oil, gas, retail and financial solutions,” Sakac explained. “But our field teams are not experts in these verticals. We produce this great content and collateral. But how does it actually land at a customer?”

To deal with this situation, the company relies on channel partners that have expertise in specific areas.  For example, Sakac said, Dell has a small partner in Ottawa that specializes in how the federal government works.

“We have the technology, but making it land into the federal government isn’t our focus. It is that partner’s focus,” he said. “Where I see partners stand out the most is if they have a superpower that is built around a workload.”

Deanna Thomson, national director of channel sales for Dell EMC Canada, agrees.

When asked what makes a successful Dell partner, she gave three items:

  • Focus on customer workloads
  • Specialization in virtualization for networks or data centres
  • Thorough understanding of Dell EMC’s technologies and message

Some of the most successful partners are “concentrating on the hyper-converged conversations,” she said. “Our growth rate in that area is off the charts.”

The less successful partners, according to Sakac, are those that are stuck in doing transaction support.

These partners, he said had always viewed converged infrastructures and hyper-converged infrastructures as technologies cutting into the value that they offered.

Mike Sharun, president of enterprise sales for Canada, at Dell EMC, noted that there’s a lot of resistance to change in more conservative IT organizations.

“They have to move away from the ‘I’ve got to build it’ way of thinking,” he said, “…It’s only a matter of time for the buy vs. build debate to get settled, and it’s going to be buy.”

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CHANNEL

Vertical workload specialization critical to Dell EMC strategy 

The ability of channel partners to offer expertise and services relevant to specific industries is key to Dell EMC’s ability to translate its digital transformation message to customers, according to the company’s top executives.

Dell EMC partners are able to provide Canadian customers with specialized workload expertise that experts the Mass.-based multinational technology corporation cannot provide, said Chad Sakac, president of Dell EMC’s converged platforms division, following his presentation at the Dell EMC Forum in Toronto on Thursday.

Dell EMC can offer up its wide selection of technologies, he said, but to actually get its products and services to “land at a customer” is a challenge because “we are not structured around workloads.

“I have a team that builds technical computing solutions around oil, gas, retail and financial solutions,” Sakac explained. “But our field teams are not experts in these verticals. We produce this great content and collateral. But how does it actually land at a customer?”

To deal with this situation, the company relies on channel partners that have expertise in specific areas.  For example, Sakac said, Dell has a small partner in Ottawa that specializes in how the federal government works.

“We have the technology, but making it land into the federal government isn’t our focus. It is that partner’s focus,” he said. “Where I see partners stand out the most is if they have a superpower that is built around a workload.”

Deanna Thomson, national director of channel sales for Dell EMC Canada, agrees.

When asked what makes a successful Dell partner, she gave three items:

  • Focus on customer workloads
  • Specialization in virtualization for networks or data centres
  • Thorough understanding of Dell EMC’s technologies and message

Some of the most successful partners are “concentrating on the hyper-converged conversations,” she said. “Our growth rate in that area is off the charts.”

The less successful partners, according to Sakac, are those that are stuck in doing transaction support.

These partners, he said had always viewed converged infrastructures and hyper-converged infrastructures as technologies cutting into the value that they offered.

Mike Sharun, president of enterprise sales for Canada, at Dell EMC, noted that there’s a lot of resistance to change in more conservative IT organizations.

“They have to move away from the ‘I’ve got to build it’ way of thinking,” he said, “…It’s only a matter of time for the buy vs. build debate to get settled, and it’s going to be buy.”


Author: Nestor Arellano

Nestor Arellano is the Associate Editor for IT in Canada. He is a seasoned media veteran who specializes in technology and business news. Before joining IT in Canada Nestor worked as a journalist for IT World Canada, Mortgage Broker News and Thomson Reuters. His work has also appeared in other major news and tech publications in Canada and the United States both in print and online. Nestor also regularly blogs and tweets on the latest technology trends and gadgets.

Follow on Twitter: @ITIC_NestorA

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