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Technology gets schooled
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Technology gets schooled 

Dreams of a classroom powered by technology are now becoming reality, and HP is working to create devices that can propel the learning experience to new heights. Elliott Levine, Education Strategist, Printing and Personal Systems for the Americas at HP explains what the company is doing to transform the classroom, and how students and teachers can benefit from these new developments.

IT in Canada: An increasing number of classrooms around the world are integrating technology into their daily learning activities. Why is this?
Levine: For the past century, most teaching efforts centered on passive learning methods – listening to lectures, reading books and in the past 50 years, watching filmstrips, movies and videos. Yet, studies from the 1960s, particularly Edgar Dale’s “Cone of Experience” explains how learning by listening, learning by reading and learning by watching remain some of the most ineffective methods.

Instead, more active learning strategies (discussion of topics, project-based learning, simulations, or teaching others) yield far greater retention and mastery of subject matter materials. Technology can serve as that catalyst for change, giving both teachers and learners the opportunity to engage in more active methods of learning. When schools leverage technology for such advanced methods – versus using technology to replicate older, analog methods – then classrooms can become more effective learning centers.

ITIC: Why is now the time to introduce better educational technology?
EL: Education today is at a crossroads. On one side, technology is becoming much more affordable for schools, especially with many student-focused devices now well below the $300 mark. On the other side, the cost for traditional instructional content continues to climb well beyond the consumer price index. One recent study confirms that the cost of college textbooks has risen 142 per cent in 15 years, and likely a similar increase for K-12.

Research from organizations, such as ProjectRED, have stated that, if implemented properly, a student 1:1 technology program can save $445 per student, per year in terms of reduced disciplinary actions, less reliance on printed materials and reduction of course failures. Further, a digital learning environment facilitates real personalized learning for every student, whereas older teaching methods could only explore differentiated learning by groups. No longer does technology need to represent an investment layered upon a school’s existing budget. By spending smarter – not greater – schools can create more impactful learning environments with the same budgets.  

ITIC: How is HP helping to create a more connected classroom?
EL: We have hundreds of people across the globe that work heavily with schools on their technology initiatives. While many schools still want to focus solely on devices, HP’s teams want to speak about outcomes. We partner with some of the leading organizations to help schools plan, measure and implement their digital learning environments.

Our National Education Technology Framework provides a step-by-step process to help school systems of all sizes create education technology programs that generate meaningful outcomes for their students and their communities, addressing policy, readiness as well as implementation and sustainability practices.

In addition, HP has helped fund innovative research examining the efficacy of 1:1 learning and identifying the best strategies for implementation with such organizations as ProjectRED. We’ve also funded independent research to examine the impact of operating system compatibility to the learning process.

ITIC: What products and services has HP developed for educational use?
EL: The HP Education Editions are built tough to withstand the rigors of daily academic use and feature battery-life that can last the entire school day.  They’re designed for learning with the all-new HP School Pack, a set of innovative tools to enhance instruction, engagement and encourage active educational use.

First of all, the HP Pro Tablet 10 EE and HP Pro Slate 10 EE Education Edition Tablets are built to survive the rigors of schools, toughened with IP52 rating for dust and moisture, and designed to pass drop tests. Both tablets feature a 10-inch diagonal HD touch anti-glare display, with a family of optional learning accessories like a tethered and garaged stylus and hard-wired keyboard base that meets student assessment requirements — all at a price that makes learning affordable.

The HP ProBook 11 Education Edition notebook is constructed using co-molded industrial rubber — it is built to last, wherever learning happens.  The corners, grips and edges are encased in this new material to enhance structural strength while conserving weight. It is powerful, versatile and boasts up to Intel® Core™ performance with optional touchscreen, empowering breakthrough experiences miles beyond netbooks.

All of them feature all-new toughened designs created specifically for schools, serviceable batteries that can last all school day, Windows and Android-based offerings, WLANas well as a WWAN optionsand a full range of multimedia connections enabling project-based learning.

The tablet and notebook Education Editions are preloaded with a host of instructional, management and supplemental tools called HP School Pack. HP School Pack is anchored by HP Classroom Manager Student Edition, which allows teachers to take control of the classroom, manage class PCs, and communicate seamlessly with students.

They provide quality learning for every student, enabling them to learn critical thinking, collaboration, global society¸

Additionally, a series of mobile, affordable and manageable Cloud-first devices were also announced with the HP Stream 11 Pro for Education and HP family of Chromebook™ devices (HP Chromebook 11 and HP Chromebook 14).

Apart from these great devices, HP also announces useful software bundles and online educator training courses to reinforce its strategy to produce meaningful outcomes for students, teachers and communities through the innovative use of technology.

Link Technology creates a fully interactive, cost effective link between the printed and digital worlds utilizing HP’s fleet of augmented reality tools.

HP also announced a new, global online course for ministers of education and teachers.  HP PISA (Program for International Student Assessment): A Tool for Teaching and Learning provides the history, usage and interpretation of the leading international assessment standard.  Further, mini-courses in PISA Math, PISA Science and PISA Reading offer the world’s teachers the opportunity to maximize their understanding of the PISA standards and integrate technology into their instruction in the most effective ways. 

ITIC: How does this technology promote community building?
EL: One of the most overlooked facets to any successful initiative is stakeholder relations. Transforming a school system from an analog to a real digital learning environment requires much more than merely buying new devices. It requires an open dialogue between faculty, staff, students, parents, local business leaders and other stakeholder groups.

When initiatives are created by a superintendent, they only survive as long as that person’s tenure. But when there is buy in across all community groups, that digital initiative becomes part of the culture of that school community. They share in the success and failure of the program, and there’s an ongoing commitment to funding such efforts on an ongoing basis.

Only a select few district leaders recognize the importance of stakeholder engagement and are willing to share control and seek guidance from a more diverse audience…but those are the ones with the greatest chance to succeed.

ITIC: What does the future hold for educational technology?
EL: There are entire books dedicated to this topic, but it I were to answer this in 30 seconds or less, I think there will be some significant trends – not fads – likely to impact educational technology in the coming years:

Consume vs. create vs. innovate. While today we debate the benefits of treating students as consumers of content (textbooks, apps) and creators of content (documents, presentations), we will continue to push into the area of meaningful innovation. More learning will involve coming up with new concepts and designs. They will require higher processing power than everyday devices can handle, which will create a demand for labs of high performance computing and high quality output.

Lifting education to the Z-axis. Whether on a tablet, laptop or interactive whiteboard, learning today exists in a 2-dimensional world. We are on the verge of becoming more immersed in 3-D learning environments and augmented and blended realities. Tools such as HP’s Zvr virtual reality display, HP Aurasma and HP Sprout are changing the way we interact and learn with even everyday objects.

Personal learning engines. Soon we will see individualized education plans (IEPs) for every student. Not only can technology assess performance on a daily basis and deliver unique content based on what you know, what you don’t know and why you don’t know it. But technology can also take into account the modality of learning that works best for each specific learner. Some students thrive with worksheets, some watch videos, others roll up their sleeves and do projects. Personalized learning will deliver that learner-centric environment but also treat learning objects as small chunks of information (i.e. short resources vs. entire textbooks).

Technology gets schooled

No more pencils, no more books. An increasing amount of schools around the world are incorporating educational technology into daily classroom activities. New devices, software and applications are changing the face of education, turning lectures into interactive experiences that keep students interested.

Dreams of a classroom powered by technology are now becoming reality, and HP is working to create devices that can propel the learning experience to new heights. Elliott Levine, Education Strategist, Printing and Personal Systems for the Americas at HP explains what the company is doing to transform the classroom, and how students and teachers can benefit from these new developments.

IT in Canada: An increasing number of classrooms around the world are integrating technology into their daily learning activities. Why is this?
Levine: For the past century, most teaching efforts centered on passive learning methods – listening to lectures, reading books and in the past 50 years, watching filmstrips, movies and videos. Yet, studies from the 1960s, particularly Edgar Dale’s “Cone of Experience” explains how learning by listening, learning by reading and learning by watching remain some of the most ineffective methods.

Instead, more active learning strategies (discussion of topics, project-based learning, simulations, or teaching others) yield far greater retention and mastery of subject matter materials. Technology can serve as that catalyst for change, giving both teachers and learners the opportunity to engage in more active methods of learning. When schools leverage technology for such advanced methods – versus using technology to replicate older, analog methods – then classrooms can become more effective learning centers.

ITIC: Why is now the time to introduce better educational technology?
EL: Education today is at a crossroads. On one side, technology is becoming much more affordable for schools, especially with many student-focused devices now well below the $300 mark. On the other side, the cost for traditional instructional content continues to climb well beyond the consumer price index. One recent study (http://www.aei.org/publication/markets-in-everything-textbook-alternatives-from-boundless/) confirms that the cost of college textbooks has risen 142 per cent in 15 years, and likely a similar increase for K-12.

Research from organizations, such as ProjectRED, have stated that, if implemented properly, a student 1:1 technology program can save $445 per student, per year in terms of reduced disciplinary actions, less reliance on printed materials and reduction of course failures. Further, a digital learning environment facilitates real personalized learning for every student, whereas older teaching methods could only explore differentiated learning by groups. No longer does technology need to represent an investment layered upon a school’s existing budget. By spending smarter – not greater – schools can create more impactful learning environments with the same budgets.  

ITIC: How is HP helping to create a more connected classroom?
EL: We have hundreds of people across the globe that work heavily with schools on their technology initiatives. While many schools still want to focus solely on devices, HP’s teams want to speak about outcomes. We partner with some of the leading organizations to help schools plan, measure and implement their digital learning environments.

Our National Education Technology Framework provides a step-by-step process to help school systems of all sizes create education technology programs that generate meaningful outcomes for their students and their communities, addressing policy, readiness as well as implementation and sustainability practices.

In addition, HP has helped fund innovative research examining the efficacy of 1:1 learning and identifying the best strategies for implementation with such organizations as ProjectRED. We’ve also funded independent research to examine the impact of operating system compatibility to the learning process.

ITIC: What products and services has HP developed for educational use?
EL: The HP Education Editions are built tough to withstand the rigors of daily academic use and feature battery-life that can last the entire school day.  They’re designed for learning with the all-new HP School Pack, a set of innovative tools to enhance instruction, engagement and encourage active educational use.

First of all, the HP Pro Tablet 10 EE and HP Pro Slate 10 EE Education Edition Tablets are built to survive the rigors of schools, toughened with IP52 rating for dust and moisture, and designed to pass drop tests. Both tablets feature a 10-inch diagonal HD touch anti-glare display, with a family of optional learning accessories like a tethered and garaged stylus and hard-wired keyboard base that meets student assessment requirements — all at a price that makes learning affordable.

The HP ProBook 11 Education Edition notebook is constructed using co-molded industrial rubber — it is built to last, wherever learning happens.  The corners, grips and edges are encased in this new material to enhance structural strength while conserving weight. It is powerful, versatile and boasts up to Intel® Core™ performance with optional touchscreen, empowering breakthrough experiences miles beyond netbooks.

All of them feature all-new toughened designs created specifically for schools, serviceable batteries that can last all school day, Windows and Android-based offerings, WLANas well as a WWAN optionsand a full range of multimedia connections enabling project-based learning.

The tablet and notebook Education Editions are preloaded with a host of instructional, management and supplemental tools called HP School Pack. HP School Pack is anchored by HP Classroom Manager Student Edition, which allows teachers to take control of the classroom, manage class PCs, and communicate seamlessly with students.

They provide quality learning for every student, enabling them to learn critical thinking, collaboration, global society¸

Additionally, a series of mobile, affordable and manageable Cloud-first devices were also announced with the HP Stream 11 Pro for Education and HP family of Chromebook™ devices (HP Chromebook 11 and HP Chromebook 14).

Apart from these great devices, HP also announces useful software bundles and online educator training courses to reinforce its strategy to produce meaningful outcomes for students, teachers and communities through the innovative use of technology.

Link Technology creates a fully interactive, cost effective link between the printed and digital worlds utilizing HP’s fleet of augmented reality tools.

HP also announced a new, global online course for ministers of education and teachers.  HP PISA (Program for International Student Assessment): A Tool for Teaching and Learning provides the history, usage and interpretation of the leading international assessment standard.  Further, mini-courses in PISA Math, PISA Science and PISA Reading offer the world’s teachers the opportunity to maximize their understanding of the PISA standards and integrate technology into their instruction in the most effective ways. 

ITIC: How does this technology promote community building?
EL: One of the most overlooked facets to any successful initiative is stakeholder relations. Transforming a school system from an analog to a real digital learning environment requires much more than merely buying new devices. It requires an open dialogue between faculty, staff, students, parents, local business leaders and other stakeholder groups.

When initiatives are created by a superintendent, they only survive as long as that person’s tenure. But when there is buy in across all community groups, that digital initiative becomes part of the culture of that school community. They share in the success and failure of the program, and there’s an ongoing commitment to funding such efforts on an ongoing basis.

Only a select few district leaders recognize the importance of stakeholder engagement and are willing to share control and seek guidance from a more diverse audience…but those are the ones with the greatest chance to succeed.

ITIC: What does the future hold for educational technology?
EL: There are entire books dedicated to this topic, but it I were to answer this in 30 seconds or less, I think there will be some significant trends – not fads – likely to impact educational technology in the coming years:

Consume vs. create vs. innovate. While today we debate the benefits of treating students as consumers of content (textbooks, apps) and creators of content (documents, presentations), we will continue to push into the area of meaningful innovation. More learning will involve coming up with new concepts and designs. They will require higher processing power than everyday devices can handle, which will create a demand for labs of high performance computing and high quality output.

Lifting education to the Z-axis. Whether on a tablet, laptop or interactive whiteboard, learning today exists in a 2-dimensional world. We are on the verge of becoming more immersed in 3-D learning environments and augmented and blended realities. Tools such as HP’s Zvr virtual reality display, HP Aurasma and HP Sprout are changing the way we interact and learn with even everyday objects.

Personal learning engines. Soon we will see individualized education plans (IEPs) for every student. Not only can technology assess performance on a daily basis and deliver unique content based on what you know, what you don’t know and why you don’t know it. But technology can also take into account the modality of learning that works best for each specific learner. Some students thrive with worksheets, some watch videos, others roll up their sleeves and do projects. Personalized learning will deliver that learner-centric environment but also treat learning objects as small chunks of information (i.e. short resources vs. entire textbooks).

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