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Looking into IT’s crystal ball
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Looking into IT’s crystal ball 

The New Year is now in full swing, and there have been many predictions about how the IT industry will fare. Adam Howatson, CMO of OpenText looked into his crystal ball and shared some of his predictions for 2015.

IT in Canada: Some of the biggest technology stories of 2014 involved security issues, such as data leaks and the Sony email scandal. How will security measures evolve in 2015 to help prevent these issues from reoccurring?
Howatson: There is no such thing as perfect security, but what we can all do is take the right measures to ensure we are as safe as possible. This means controlling your organization’s information, managing its access, and ensuring that data isn’t left unprotected and unknown. Proper information governance and a relentless vigilance are our best defense.

I think one of the biggest changes we’re going to see is the pace at which security issues are resolved from a software perspective. Bad actors will always be out there and always looking to find the latest vulnerability, social engineering opportunity or other malicious vector. What is different now is the pace at which software companies can both detect and respond to threats. What is more, two-factor authentication, more expedient ‘fix’ proliferation in cloud technologies and faster alerting compound this advancement in our capacity to understand and respond to security threats.

In order to assess and control a situation once it’s arisen, an organization needs to have proper control of its digital information, assets and intellectual property. To achieve this, one needs to understand and manager their digital information before an event has occurred.

ITIC: Cloud computing has been on the rise for several years now, and its popularity increased further in 2014. Do you see more businesses adopting the cloud model in 2015? Why or why not?
AH:
Yes, we believe that the cloud will be embraced en masse in 2015.  The cloud has become a defining technology for the 21st century and the benefits for businesses are huge. For example, by digitizing information-intensive processes, costs can be cut by up to 90 percent and turnaround times can be significantly improved. Additionally, with the increasing adoption of mobile computing devices and improvements in connectivity, the potential for cloud-related technologies is immense. The cloud gives organizations the ability to respond quickly and nimbly to market opportunities.

What we expect to see by the end of 2015 is a world of hybrid deployments in which some information and applications reside in the cloud and the remainder resides on premise. Data security is a top priority, and a hybrid model allows organizations to balance their workload, meeting all their data sovereignty requirements while leveraging the power of the cloud.

ITIC: Businesses are always looking to improve their connectivity, and the Internet of Things has enabled them to do so seamlessly. What will the New Year bring for IoT?
AH: The Internet of Things is certainly changing the world as we know it, creating a giant, global network of devices and machines that are seamlessly communicating and exchanging data. Predictions for the market suggest it will grow to 50 billion connected devices by 2020, with a value of $14.4 trillion.

The reality is that the Internet of Things is already here. From connected cars to smart thermostats and refrigerators, many of our everyday appliances are already well on their way to being able to self-monitor and communicate with a network. Organizations are also on the bandwagon, with many in both the private and public sectors already using sensor-based technologies to improve customer experience, production, inventory control and to regulate energy use. In 2015, people will start to realize that the Internet of Things is just the next evolution of the internet.

ITIC: The traditional workplace is in a constant state of evolution, with new apps, software and devices being rolled out to improve conditions for mobile employees. Do you see the workplace becoming even more mobility-reliant in 2015?
AH: Mobility will absolutely continue to be a major component of business in 2015. Mobility is not only crucial to success for many industries – employees are now demanding that they are given the type of freedom that mobile devices provide. Companies are starting to see the benefits of this more agile form of business, and will continue to embrace it in the New Year.

Another key part of this trend is the growing number of mobile devices. This year, as more wearables enter the tech scene, the focus will shift from whether or not a company is mobile-enabled to how they can best take advantage of these new technologies. With mobility, it will no longer be a question of if we’ll do it, but what we’ll do with it. Mobility, sensors and wearable technologies together are going to have a profound effect on business.

ITIC: Data centres are helping major companies to store, access and manage their data. In 2014, many companies shifted towards the flash-based model for data storage as a cost-saving procedure. Will more companies adopt the flash-based model in 2015? Why or why not?
AH: There’s no doubt that flash-based storage in the data centre is quickly becoming mainstream, and a lot of companies are just now realizing the benefits. Storage is an interesting topic, considering we literally can’t produce it fast enough to ‘feed’ the cloud.

A recent IDC study from September 2014 examines the role of flash storage in the data centre and claims that the global flash-based storage will be an $11.3 billion market in 2014. In 2015, I think you’ll continue to see flash-based storage gain even more momentum, especially as more companies see improved performance and other benefits from the technology, and ultimately share that knowledge with their peers.

Looking into IT’s crystal ball

 

Mobility. Cloud computing. Security beaches. Hacking scandals. These were some of the top news items in the IT world during 2014. The industry saw a number of new developments that sought to change IT management and modern workplace, but there were also some issues that brought forth significant challenges.

 

The New Year is now in full swing, and there have been many predictions about how the IT industry will fare. Adam Howatson, CMO of OpenText looked into his crystal ball and shared some of his predictions for 2015.

 

IT in Canada: Some of the biggest technology stories of 2014 involved security issues, such as data leaks and the Sony email scandal. How will security measures evolve in 2015 to help prevent these issues from reoccurring?

 

Howatson: There is no such thing as perfect security, but what we can all do is take the right measures to ensure we are as safe as possible. This means controlling your organization’s information, managing its access, and ensuring that data isn’t left unprotected and unknown. Proper information governance and a relentless vigilance are our best defense.

 

I think one of the biggest changes we’re going to see is the pace at which security issues are resolved from a software perspective. Bad actors will always be out there and always looking to find the latest vulnerability, social engineering opportunity or other malicious vector. What is different now is the pace at which software companies can both detect and respond to threats. What is more, two-factor authentication, more expedient ‘fix’ proliferation in cloud technologies and faster alerting compound this advancement in our capacity to understand and respond to security threats.

 

In order to assess and control a situation once it’s arisen, an organization needs to have proper control of its digital information, assets and intellectual property. To achieve this, one needs to understand and manager their digital information before an event has occurred.

 

ITIC: Cloud computing has been on the rise for several years now, and its popularity increased further in 2014. Do you see more businesses adopting the cloud model in 2015? Why or why not?

 

AH: Yes, we believe that the cloud will be embraced en masse in 2015.  The cloud has become a defining technology for the 21st century and the benefits for businesses are huge. For example, by digitizing information-intensive processes, costs can be cut by up to 90 percent and turnaround times can be significantly improved. Additionally, with the increasing adoption of mobile computing devices and improvements in connectivity, the potential for cloud-related technologies is immense. The cloud gives organizations the ability to respond quickly and nimbly to market opportunities.

 

What we expect to see by the end of 2015 is a world of hybrid deployments in which some information and applications reside in the cloud and the remainder resides on premise. Data security is a top priority, and a hybrid model allows organizations to balance their workload, meeting all their data sovereignty requirements while leveraging the power of the cloud.

 

ITIC: Businesses are always looking to improve their connectivity, and the Internet of Things has enabled them to do so seamlessly. What will the New Year bring for IoT?

 

AH: The Internet of Things is certainly changing the world as we know it, creating a giant, global network of devices and machines that are seamlessly communicating and exchanging data. Predictions for the market suggest it will grow to 50 billion connected devices by 2020, with a value of $14.4 trillion.

 

The reality is that the Internet of Things is already here. From connected cars to smart thermostats and refrigerators, many of our everyday appliances are already well on their way to being able to self-monitor and communicate with a network. Organizations are also on the bandwagon, with many in both the private and public sectors already using sensor-based technologies to improve customer experience, production, inventory control and to regulate energy use. In 2015, people will start to realize that the Internet of Things is just the next evolution of the internet.

 

ITIC: The traditional workplace is in a constant state of evolution, with new apps, software and devices being rolled out to improve conditions for mobile employees. Do you see the workplace becoming even more mobility-reliant in 2015?

 

AH: Mobility will absolutely continue to be a major component of business in 2015. Mobility is not only crucial to success for many industries – employees are now demanding that they are given the type of freedom that mobile devices provide. Companies are starting to see the benefits of this more agile form of business, and will continue to embrace it in the New Year.

 

Another key part of this trend is the growing number of mobile devices. This year, as more wearables enter the tech scene, the focus will shift from whether or not a company is mobile-enabled to how they can best take advantage of these new technologies. With mobility, it will no longer be a question of if we’ll do it, but what we’ll do with it. Mobility, sensors and wearable technologies together are going to have a profound effect on business.

 

ITIC: Data centres are helping major companies to store, access and manage their data. In 2014, many companies shifted towards the flash-based model for data storage as a cost-saving procedure. Will more companies adopt the flash-based model in 2015? Why or why not?

 

AH: There’s no doubt that flash-based storage in the data centre is quickly becoming mainstream, and a lot of companies are just now realizing the benefits. Storage is an interesting topic, considering we literally can’t produce it fast enough to ‘feed’ the cloud.

 

A recent IDC study from September 2014 examines the role of flash storage in the data centre and claims that the global flash-based storage will be an $11.3 billion market in 2014. In 2015, I think you’ll continue to see flash-based storage gain even more momentum, especially as more companies see improved performance and other benefits from the technology, and ultimately share that knowledge with their peers.

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